Key Milestones

1990-2000

Lloyd Oldfield acquired Waterfall Springs and dedicated the property to conservation purposes. The construction of the fences began and a number of licences were obtained from various government departments to enable the association to rescue, rehabilitate and breed a variety of macropods.

2000-2010

Waterfall Springs Conservation Association was Incorporated (WSCA Inc). A major achievement during this time was the implementation and funding of the repatriation of 33 Brush-tailes Rock Wallabies from Kawau Island NZ. The Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby captive breeding program also commenced. (southern and central form). The breeding program was so successful that it saw the captive population increase and the females produced second offspring. In 2007 Waterfall Springs provided its first BTRW breeding stock to partner organisations to support other BTRW breeding programs. Due to this success, new facilities were constructed to support this ever-expanding breeding program. Such facilities included; the WS Conservation Centre and new animal enclosures. From 2008 until 2009 10 southern BTRW were reintroduced into the Grampians National Park, 4 released into the Shoalhaven region in NSW and 5 released at the Jenolan Caves. In 2009 captive bred BTRW were relocated to the Warrumbungles National Park. This was a massive achievement as it was the biggest translocation ever achieved in Australia. It was during this decade too that Yellow-footed Rock wallabies arrived from the South Australian Department of Environment and Conservation.

2010-2016

Brush Tailed Rock Wallabies continue to be released or transferred to the following areas; Jenolan Caves, Warrumbungles, Kangaroo Valley, Blackbutt Reserve, Taronga Zoo for their captive breeding program, Sydney Wildlife World, Tidbindilla Nature Reserve, Blackbutt Reserve, Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary and the Ipswich Nature Reserve.

Waterfall Springs is the lead captive facility in NSW for BTRW conservation.

Due to the ongoing support and dedication from the staff and volunteers at Waterfall Springs we are leading the way to ensure that the BTRW survives and is around for future generations.

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